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The world’s safest airlines in 2019

AirlineRatings.com has named Qantas the safest airline for 2019. However, it presents the top-20 in alphabetical order. Thus, it is not really an airline safety ranking order. Carriers in the top-20 are:
Air New Zealand, Alaska Airlines, All Nippon Airways, American Airlines, Austrian Airlines, British Airways, Cathay Pacific Airways, Emirates, EVA Air, Finnair, Hawaiian Airlines, KLM, Lufthansa, Qantas, Qatar, SAS, Singapore Airlines, Swiss, and United Airlines, Virgin Atlantic and Virgin Australia.

Number of stars

All those carriers have the maximum number of 7 stars according to AirlineRatings.com's safety ranking system. On one hand it makes sense to present a top-20 just in alphabetical order. But on the other hand, many carriers that are not included in the top-20 also have 7 stars, so they could have been included. Thus, it is arbitrary which airlines make it to the top-20.

Factors determining safety

For evaluating carriers' safety, AirlineRatings.com takes into account a comprehensive range of factors that include:
1) Audits from aviation’s governing and industry bodies
2) Government audits
3) Airline’s crash and serious incident record
4) Profitability
5) Industry-leading safety initiatives
6) Fleet age.

Low-cost carriers

Responding to the public interest AirlineRatings.com has also identified their Top 10 safest low-cost airlines, again in alphabetical order:
Flybe, Frontier, HK Express, Jetblue, Jetstar Australia/Asia, Thomas Cook, Volaris, Vueling, Westjet and Wizz Air.

Unlike a number of other low-cost carriers, these airlines have all passed the stringent International Air Transport Association Operational Safety Audit and have excellent safety records.

Airlineratings.com also announced its lowest ranked airlines (with 1 or 2 stars), which are: Ariana Afghan Airlines, Bluewing Airlines, Kam Air, and Trigana Air Service.

Geoffrey Thomas

Geoffrey Thomas

Only serious incidents considered

The website only looks at serious incidents in making its determinations. Editor-in-Chief Geoffrey Thomas explains why:
“All airlines have incidents every day and many are aircraft manufacture issues, not airline operational problems. It is the way the flight crew handles incidents that determines a good airline from an unsafe one. So just lumping all incidents together is very misleading.”

Related: "The world’s safest and most dangerous airlines"

Tag: airline safety rankings

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